2020 in pictures: the year we won’t forget

2020 in pictures: the year we won’t forget

2020 in pictures: the year we won’t forget migrant workers kitchen 30 stades

The enduring memory of 2020 will be the Coronavirus pandemic, which affected the entire globe and transformed the way we live. From work, education, business to travel, eating and dying, no aspect of life remained untouched by the pandemic.

So as 2020 draws to a close, we bring you images that capture the impact of COVID-19 – whether it was migrant workers travelling hundreds of kilometres to get back home or people organising food kitchens for the poor; discrimination faced by some communities, the brave fight put up by our doctors and nurses and the compassion of those brave workers who carried out the last rites for COVID victims. These were all part of the mosaic that the pandemic gave us in 2020.

Also Read: COVID-19: Srinagar’s Dal Lake gets first-ever boat ambulance service

Towards the end of the year, farmers from Punjab and Haryana launched a vociferous agitation opposing farm laws brought about by the government and were soon joined by their counterparts from other states.

We bring you some enduring images from 2020, a year that we would all rather forget but, paradoxically, won’t be able to do so in a hurry.

Nearly 1.06 crore migrant workers walked thousands of kilometres to reach home during the COVID lockdown. Some died in road accidents or due to exhaustion before reaching home. Pic: 30 Stades
Nearly 1.06 crore migrant workers walked thousands of kilometres to reach home during the COVID lockdown. Some died in road accidents or due to exhaustion before reaching home. Pic: 30 Stades

Also Read: A migrant worker’s 1,200 km journey on foot during the Coronavirus lockdown

Shramik special trains started for migrants on May 1 did not have facilities for buying even water. Some migrants dies on the trains due to the scorching summer heat. No data is available on these deaths.
Shramik special trains started for migrants on May 1 did not have facilities for buying even water. Some migrants dies on the trains due to the scorching summer heat. No data is available on these deaths. Pic: Flickr
Our doctors, nurses and other paramedics began the fight against COVID as early as January and are leading the battle till date. Many of them have lost lives while trying to save others. Pic: 30 Stades
Our doctors, nurses and other paramedics began the fight against COVID as early as January and are leading the battle till date. Many of them have lost lives while trying to save others. Pic: 30 Stades

Also Read: Delhi nurse narrates his life experience as a COVID-19 warrior

Thousands of chefs and volunteers came out despite the pandemic to cook for the poor, unemployed and migrants. Cooking, packing, carrying, distributing food was all they did for many months. Pic: 30 Stades
Thousands of chefs and volunteers came out despite the pandemic to cook for the poor, unemployed and migrants. Cooking, packing, carrying, distributing food was all they did for many months. Pic: 30 Stades
Those in slums were the worst affected as social distancing was impossible, they lost their jobs and had to queue up for every meal. Pic: CRISIL
Those in slums were the worst affected as social distancing was impossible, they lost their jobs and had to queue up for every meal. Pic: CRISIL

Also Read: Dharavi: Coronavirus lockdown may change Asia’s largest slum forever

A woman in Dharavi after collecting ration from NGO Dharavi Diary. Beginning December 25, no new case has been reported from Dharavi, Asia's largest slum, which was one of the worst affected by COVID-19. Pic: Dharavi Diary
A woman in Dharavi after collecting ration from NGO Dharavi Diary. Beginning December 25, no new case has been reported from Dharavi, Asia’s largest slum, which was one of the worst affected by COVID-19. Pic: Dharavi Diary
People from the NorthEast faced discrimination due to their Mongoloid or Chinese features, which prompted people to ridicule and boycott them. They were almost driven out of their homes as people thought they could spread COVID. Pic: Courtesy  Dr Alana Golmei
People from the NorthEast faced discrimination due to their Mongoloid or Chinese features, which prompted people to ridicule and boycott them. They were almost driven out of their homes as people thought they could spread COVID. Pic: Courtesy Dr Alana Golmei

Also See: COVID-19: Dharavi & Mumbai’s other slums in pictures

When family members could not participate in the last rites of COVID victims, our corona warriors stepped in, even cremating bodies shunned by family members.  Here, a dead body being incinerated by members of Surat-based NGO Ekta Trust. Pic: Ekta Trust
When family members could not participate in the last rites of COVID victims, our corona warriors stepped in, even cremating bodies shunned by family members. Here, a dead body being incinerated by members of Surat-based NGO Ekta Trust. Pic: Ekta Trust
 Funeral ghat in Varanasi turned empty for the first time in centuries as people did not visit the holy town for cremation amid the pandemic. Pic: Bahadur Choudhary
Funeral ghat in Varanasi turned empty for the first time in centuries as people did not visit the holy town for cremation amid the pandemic. Pic: Bahadur Choudhary

Also Read: COVID-19 not only affects life, but also strangles the business of death

Art became a medium of expression for the life and times during COVID-19.  Tabligh Check. Pic: Hasif Khan
Art became a medium of expression for the life and times during COVID-19. Tabligh Check. Pic: Hasif Khan
People returned to frugal food habits as supply chain of most items was affected during the peak of lockdown between April and mid-June. Here, a dry vegetable dish made using peels.
People returned to frugal food habits as supply chain of most items was affected during the peak of lockdown between April and mid-June. Here, a dry vegetable dish made using peels.

Also Read: Cooking to survive vs cooking as a hobby: How coronavirus lockdown is changing food habits

Cherries, strawberries and apples rotted in Kashmir as the fruits couldn't be transported out of the valley due to COVID lockdown. Farmers, already under debt, booked huge losses. Pic: Wasim Nabi
Cherries, strawberries and apples rotted in Kashmir as the fruits couldn’t be transported out of the valley due to COVID lockdown. Farmers, already under debt, booked huge losses. Pic: Wasim Nabi
Teachers in many parts of India innovated methods to teach students who could not access online classes. Here, teachers in Kashmir running open-air classrooms. Pic: Rouf Fida
Teachers in many parts of India innovated methods to teach students who could not access online classes. Here, teachers in Kashmir running open-air classrooms. Pic: Rouf Fida

Also Read: Lockdown: Kashmir’s teachers run open-air classrooms as Internet ban rules out online education

On November 25, lakhs of farmers from Punjab, old and young, began agitation against the Centre’s farm laws. Braving cold, the farmers have been continuing their protest even now. Some have also lost their lives.
Farmers from other states including Rajasthan and Maharashtra have joined the protest. Here, farmers from Rajasthan farmers are
Farmers from other states including Rajasthan and Maharashtra have joined the protest. Here, farmers from Rajasthan farmers are

Also Read: How COVID-19 has changed India’s sex work industry

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